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Blind Dog's Blues (BDR-0975) Nov. Broadcasting


Ma Rainey - Those Dogs Of Mine; Earl McDonald's Original Louisville Jug Band - She's In The Graveyard Now; Frank Stokes - Right Now Blues (1929); Robert Lee McCoy - Prowling Nighthawk; Sonny Terry - Fox Chase (6503-A-2); Babe Stovall - How Long How Long Blues; King Solomon Hill - Tell Me Baby; St. Louis Jimmy Oden - Thick And Thin; Birmingham Jug Band - Bill Wilson; Henry Thomas - Charmin' Betsy; Memphis Minnie - Let Me Ride; Big Bill Broonzy - The Sun Gonna Shine In My Door Someday (1935); Blind Willie McTell - Come On Around To My House Mama; Tampa Red - Jealous Hearted Mama Blues; Bo Carter - Fat Mouth Blues; Lonnie Johnson - Why Should I Cry; Leadbelly - Pigmeat; Memphis Jug Band - Spider's Nest Blues; Blind Willie Johnson - The Rain Don't Fall On Me; Edward Thompson - Showers Of Rain Blues; Henry Townsend - Buzz Buzz Buzz; Jesse 'Monkey Joe' Coleman - O.K. With Me Baby; Blind Boy Fuller - I'm Going To Move (To The Edge Of Town); Snooks Eaglin - Who's Been Foolin' You; Blind Blake - Walkin' Across The Country; Big Mama Thornton - I Need Your Love; Snooks Eaglin - See See Rider; William Brown - East St. Louis Blues; Buddy Boy Hawkins - Hot Time Blues; Skip James - Illinois Blues; Mississippi John Hurt - Richland Woman Blues; Washboard Sam - Gonna Be Some Walkin' Done; Guitar Slim & Jelly Belly - She's Evil And Mean; Memphis Minnie & Kansas Joe - Cherry Ball Blues; Henry Spaulding - Cairo Blues; Jesse James - Lonesome Day Blues; Papa Charlie Jackson - Big Feeling Blues; Papa Harvey Hull & Long "Cleve" Reed (The Down Home Boys) - Hey! Lawdy Mama; Mississippi Sheiks - Church Bell Blues; Rutherford & Foster - There's More Pretty Girls Than One; Arthur "Big Boy" Crudup - Roebuck Man; Muddy Waters - Joe Turner Blues; Cephas & Wiggins - Highway 301; Furry Lewis - The Medicine Shows; Charley Patton - Rattlesnake Blues; Edith North Johnson - Honey Dripper Blues No.2; Josh White - Baby Won't You Doodle-Doo-Doo; Ma Rainey - Georgia Cake Walk; Mance Lipscomb - Motherless Children; Blind Joe Taggart - There's A Hand Writing On The Wall; Harlem Hamfats - Root Hog Or Die; Sylvester Weaver - Baby Boogie Woogie; ...

Complete Recorded Works, Vol. 13 (1949-1951) by Big Bill Broonzy

Label: Document Records.
Release Date: September 15, 1993.
Release Info: Compilation Studio Recording.
Recording Date: 1949 - 1951.

Styles: Country Blues, City Blues, Chicago Blues, Jazz Blues.

Informative 8 page booklet notes by Gary Atkinson
Detailed discography

Abridged from the album's booklet notes.

This thirteenth volume of recordings by Big Bill Broonzy gives some idea of how this consummate performer was able to adapt to the many musical styles, trends, settings and eras that he encountered from the pre-war to post war years. From recording studios and night clubs of Chicago, Illinois, to the concert stage and night clubs Europe; Big Bill was one of the most remarkable of the blues artists to come from the pre-war period and ultimately became a pioneer as one of the blues world's most famous ambassadors.

This collection begins, rather retrospectively, by presenting six alternative takes of titles recorded in Chicago for ARC by Big Bill between April, 1936 and January 1937. Other takes of these titles can be found on DOCD-5126 "Big Bill Broonzy Vol 4 1935 – 1936" and DOCD-5127 "Big Bill Broonzy Vol 5 1936 – 1937". Having filled in some earlier gaps in Big Bill's recording history, we move on to his first two recording sessions for the then fledgling, yet rapidly expanding, Mercury label, based in Chicago. There he met up with sax player Antonio Casey, pianist Carl Sharp, bass player Ransom Knowling and drummer Alfred Wallace.  Big Bill and his colleagues recorded five numbers. All of the performances were of a high and some might say flawless standard.These recordings, made as "Bill Broonzy and his Fat Four", represent Bill as one of the leading figures of Chicago's "City" or "Urban Blues". The band's "down-home" sound, with Bill's electric guitar and Knowling's miked-up bass gives a warm yet energetic feel to the performances. Added to this, the characteristic 1940's sound of the urban blues is accentuated further by dominant passages, crafted by the cries of Antonio Casey's alto sax. In the same way that Bill's earliest recordings, made in the late 1920's and throughout the 30s, presented him as a fine exponent of the earlier "country blues" style, with, at times, extraordinary acoustic guitar accompaniment to his instantly agreeable vocal style, so did this first powerhouse session for Mercury underline Bill's successful ability to move with the times and with great authority.

One of the best examples of his willingness to experiment and reinvent his music came with his return visit to the Mercury studios only a month later, this time with just the drummer Alfred Wallace. Following the full, urban, sound that the band had unquestionably produced in the previous session, Bill was about to successfully achieve a remarkable sea change by using a minimalistic approach to this second set of recordings for Mercury.

Track 16 and its subsequent tracks represent the final regeneration of Big Bill's music, his career as a musician and his private life. In Europe the gathering interest in blues music came from an already large and vibrant fan-base for jazz. The Dusseldorf concert would be significant for two reasons. First, it would be one of the first concerts performed by non-German jazz musicians in Germany after World War Two. Secondly, the recording of the event, presented here, would become the only recording of his "live" performances to survive from his first tour of Europe. 

Undoubtedly, compared to playing in the clubs of Chicago, during the twenties, thirties and forties, to stand on a stage in grand concert building in post-war Germany, in front of a large, white, seated audience, must have been a daunting experience for a black American performer who was relatively unknown beyond his own country. Yet, standing there alone in the spot light with only his acoustic guitar between him and his audience, Bill gently laughs and with that his audience gently laughs with him. Perhaps they are both acknowledging the extraordinary situation that they find themselves in. Indeed, Bill sounds genuinely happy as he moves with seemingly great confidence and rapport through his set. Perhaps he had taken a little "preparation" before he walked onto the stage. Who would blame him?

Instead of taking an easy route and easing himself into the set with a calm and gentle number, Bill introduces his first "title" and then opens up with a fizzing version of John Henry, using his rapid plectrum style, which he memorably used with great effect on such titles as "How You Want It Done?" recorded for the Banner label back in 1932. With the first two "thank you"'s of many to follow for his new audience, Bill by contrast, then plays the "calm" number; In The Evening When The Sun Goes Down. With perfect execution Bill has already won them over and one can only imagine the look of wonder and admiration if not curiousness of the faces in front of him as he gently eases his way, without another sound from the hall, through the song written by his old friend, the late Leroy Carr. By the end of the concert this new, enthralled audience, many, perhaps, becoming firm fans of Bill and his music for the first time, leave the hall for the bars or home, happy and satisfied.

Credits: Big Bill Broonzy - primary artist;  Big Bill Broonzy & His Fat Four - primary artist (tracks: 7 to 11); Graham Bell And His Australian Jazz Band - primary artist (tracks: 18, 19, 22, 23).

Personnel: Big Bill Broonzy - vocals, guitar; Black Bob - piano; Charley McCoy - mandolin; Antonio Casey - alto sax; Ransom Knowling - bass; Alfred Wallace - drums; Graham Bell's Australian Jazz Band.

Tracks: 1) Bull Cow Blues No. 3 (alt. take) - Big Bill Broonzy; 2) Married Life Is A Pain (alt. take) - Big Bill Broonzy; 3) Black Mare Blues (alt. take) - Big Bill Broonzy; 4) WPA Blues (alt. take) - Big Bill Broonzy; 5) Oh Babe (Don't Do Me That Way) (alt. take) - Big Bill Broonzy; 6) Little Bug (alt. take) - Big Bill Broonzy; 7) (I'm A) Wanderin' Man - Big Bill Broonzy And His Fat Four; 8) I Love My Whiskey - Big Bill Broonzy And His Fat Four; 9) You've Been Mistreating Me - Big Bill Broonzy And His Fat Four; 10) I Stay Blue All The Time - Big Bill Broonzy And His Fat Four; 11) Water Coast Blues - Big Bill Broonzy And His Fat Four; 12) Five Feet Seven - Big Bill Broonzy; 13) I Wonder - Big Bill Broonzy; 14) Keep Your Hands Off Her - Big Bill Broonzy; 15) Mindin' My Own Business - Big Bill Broonzy; 16) John Henry - Big Bill Broonzy; 17) In The Evening When The Sun Goes Down - Big Bill Broonzy; 18) I Feel So Good - Big Bill Broonzy And Graham Bell's Australian Jazz Band; 19) Who's Sorry Now - Big Bill Broonzy And Graham Bell's Australian Jazz Band; 20) Trouble In Mind - Big Bill Broonzy; 21) Keep your Hands Off Her - Big Bill Broonzy; 22) Mama Don't Allow - Big Bill Broonzy And Graham Bell's Australian Jazz Band; 23) When The Saints Go Marching In - Big Bill Broonzy And Graham Bell's Australian Jazz Band.

Baby Please Don't Go Back To New Orleans by Leroy Dallas

Baby Please Don't Go Back To New Orleans - Leroy Dallas, E position, standard tuning.

INTRO SOLO

Baby, please don't go, baby, please don't go
Baby, please don't go back to New Orleans, baby, please don't go

Got me way down here, got me way down here
Got me way down here by Rolling Forks, treat me like a dog

B'lieve my man done gone, b'lieve my man done gone
B'lieve my man done gone to the county farm, b'lieve my man done gone

Did you know his name? Did you know his name?
When he jumped off the truck you could not see 'im for the dust, you oughta heard him sing

Ain't but three more places, so Leroy wanta go
Atlanta, Florida, one trip to Pensacola, another trip to Balitmore

SOLO (Spoken: What you say, guitar? Baby, please don't go?)

Did you know his name? Did you know his name?
When he jumped off the truck, you could not see him for the dust, you oughta heard them sing

When my work is done, when my work is done
Well, I'm goin' down in Florida, gon' lay down on the green grass, look up at that risin' sun

Baby, please don't go, baby, please don't go
Baby, please don't go back to New Orleans, baby, please don't go

Blind Dog's Blues (BDR-0972) Nov. Broadcasting


Charley Patton - Elder Green Blues, Take 2; Ephraim Carter, J.W. Jones, James Jones, Floyd Bussey - Shout, Lulu With The Red Dress On; Robert Lee McCoy - You're All I've Got To Live For; Blind Boy Fuller - Painful Hearted Man; Bumble Bee Slim - Blues Before Daylight; Blind Blake - Hard Pushing Papa; Skip James - Cypress Grove Blues; Texas Sheiks - All By Myself; Leroy Carr - Southbound Blues; Coley Jones - Traveling Man; Ma Rainey - Sleep Talking Blues (Take 1); Muddy Waters - Burr Clover Farm Blues; Bill Gaither - Champ Joe Lewis; Mississippi Joe Callicott - On My Last Go Round; The Harlem Hamfats - I Believe I'll Make A Change; Earl McDonald's Original Louisville Jug Band - Louisville Special; Charley Patton - Joe Kirby; Tony Hollins - Crawlin' King Snake; Furry Lewis - Everybody's Blues; Arthur "Big Boy" Crudup - So Glad You're Mine; Jed Davenport - Beale Street Breakdown; Mance Lipscomb - Ella Speed; Georgia White - It Must Be Love; Mississippi Fred McDowell - Good Morning, Little School Girl; Buddie Burton - Ham Fatchet Blues Part 1; Jim Jackson - I Heard The Voice Of A Porkchop (Take 1); Mississippi John Hurt - Make Me A Pallet On Your Floor; Furry Lewis - Let Me Call You Sweetheart; Robert Pete Williams - I've Grown So Ugly; Brownie McGhee - Goodbye Now; James "Yank" Rachell - It Seems Like A Dream; Big Boy Teddy Edwards - Louisiana; Sonny Boy Williamson - Honey Bee Blues; Butterbeans & Susie - That Same Dog; Jesse Bradley And Group - Hammer Ring; Ernie Hawkins - Weeping Willow; Blind Lemon Jefferson - Long Distance Moan; Son Becky - Mistreated Washboard Blues; Sister Rosetta Tharpe - What's That News; Jesse Thomas - Meet Me Tonight Along The Avenue; Long 'Cleve' Reed & Little Harvey Hill - Original Stack O'Lee Blues; Beale Street Sheiks - You Shall (4771); Washboard Sam - You Got To Take It; Kokomo Arnold - Neck Bone Blues; Luke Jordan - Traveling Coon; Robert Johnson - Milkcow's Calf Blues; Henry Townsend - She's Got A Mean Disposition; Washboard Walter - Narrow Face Blues; Sam McGee - Chevrolet Car; Charlie Patton - Troubled Bout My Mother; The Hokum Boys - I Was Afraid Of That, Pt. 1; Memphis Minnie & Kansas Joe - I'm Wild About My Stuff; ...

Called To The Foreign Field by Alfred Karnes

Called To The Foreign Field - Alfred Karnes, G position, standard tuning.

In the far and heathen country where the people know not God
I am going there to preach his precious word
Where they bow to worship idols I am going there to stay
Where I'll labor in the vineyard of the Lord

CHORUS: I'll soon be with my loved ones in my happy heavenly home
Even now, the thought my soul with rapture thrills
So goodbye, my friends and brethren, for the time has come to go
I must leave you on the dear old battlefield

I am called to bear a message to the heathen far away
And for years, o'er there, a stranger I may roam
Just to tell them of a savior, one who died to save them all
That's the reason why I leave my native home

CHORUS: I'll soon be with my loved ones in my happy heavenly home
Even now, the thought my soul with rapture thrills
So goodbye, my friends and brethren, for the time has come to go
I must leave you on the dear old battlefield

Many days I'll climb the hillside in the sunshine and the rain
Many days I'll be in hunger and in thirst
Just to tell them that our Lord is coming back to earth again
With his gifts and blessings, all as at the first

CHORUS: I'll soon be with my loved ones in my happy heavenly home
Even now, the thought my soul with rapture thrills
So goodbye, my friends and brethren, for the time has come to go
I must leave you on the dear old battlefield

I will stand the trials and hardships just to tell them precious truths
That the Gospel of our Savior does contain
And if they will but obey them and be faithful 'til our end
Up in Heaven we will meet you all again

CHORUS: I'll soon be with my loved ones in my happy heavenly home
Even now, the thought my soul with rapture thrills
So goodbye, my friends and brethren, for the time has come to go
I must leave you on the dear old battlefield

We'll not all be foreign laborers, but the time has soon arrived
When our mission we have faithfully fulfilled
When our message is delivered and 'tis said of us, "Well done"
In triumph we'll leave the dear old battlefield

CHORUS: I'll soon be with my loved ones in my happy heavenly home
Even now, the thought my soul with rapture thrills
So goodbye, my friends and brethren, for the time has come to go
I must leave you on the dear old battlefield

Blind Mamie Forehand

b. June 8, 1895(?) in Alabama, d. c.1936 in Memphis, TN, gospel blues musician, active 1920s - 1930s.

Having made only a handful of recordings in the company of her presumed husband A.C. Forehand, the '20s performer Blind Mamie Forehand joins a class of recording artists whose uniqueness is not in name only. While it many not have been that common for women to sing the blues professionally in the '20s, Forehand was one of many who did sing gospel and also one of the few who did manage to leave compelling documentation behind. She was an active singer of spirituals on the streets of Memphis, a venue that logically led to the stylistic classification of street-corner or storefront gospel. "Honey in the Rock" is one of the titles she recorded in 1927, and these tracks have endured not just because hazy copyright status has led to overlapping reissue documentation on an international level. In fact, due to the efforts of labels such as Wolf, it is easier to find a Blind Mamie Forehand recording in Austria than a jar of peanut butter. The actual music content is something that once heard is never forgotten; the robust singers accompanying themselves on cymbals so old one can imagine clouds of dust bursting forth with each crash. - Blind Mamie Forehand Biography by Eugene Chadbourne